#zerotohero Comment to Post: A Reflective Conversation

Image

So. Our challenge, Day 16, for the #zerotohero WordPress blogging challenge is to read many and comment on two others’ post from yesterday’s post on a writing prompt [ find prompt here ].

Pause…

I started with my new favorite food blog, because it was breakfast: Made by Steven I enjoy seeing what interesting Japanese, Indian, or other delights he created this time and decided it was time I let him know I appreciate his blog and work:

I love reading your posts and viewing your images; everything looks divine, and the design is pleasing. I especially love your header image — I could reach in and try one, but which? Ah. too difficult to decide. I will one day discover one of your dishes to make. Glad you decided to blog about your passion.

Be sure to follow his blog for delicate delights for your taste buds.

Next, I learned a new word: spraff: to talk a lot about nothing. That’s the blog I read: Incidents of a Dysfunctional Spraffer

I enjoyed the post and agree with your words. “Everyone has different reputations decided by different groups of people,” is so true. And I appreciate learning more about how your music and art are important to you, and part of how you share yourself. I like this line also: “Maybe people would get on with their lives slightly more efficiently if they weren’t worrying about reputations.” So your spraffing today revealed some gems for us to ponder!  Thanks!

He [corrected from She, sorry ] said what I wanted to say — it’s so good to read other’s ideas because their twist of thought sometimes sparks your own, and their way of saying it helps clarify your own. It’s like a conversation in pauses; we learn from each other perhaps more readily because of that pause — that time to reflect that is perhaps deeper than face to face.

And, finally, I discovered a school reputation post from flash fiction author Rob Ross‘s blog Rob’s Surf Report. I could identify with those feelings through the students I have and the sons I raised, who helped me understand the spirit within each child. I told Rob: his post showed

“the spark that rebelled causing a bit of trouble for you in school. I see you survived very well — your blog is interesting, well-designed, and full of diverse postings. I imagine you’ve created a life that is the also full of spirit and interest.

It’s a difficult task for teachers to honor the spirit and also rein it enough to focus on the learning. And it’s an even more difficult task to encourage that spirit to grow in a way that guides without controlling. In today’s schools, teachers are mandated to improve scores, not to nurture nature and help students develop their talents, which, in turn, would lead to success in any area the young person would choose. Since my own boys were those with a reputation, I understood the soul behind the scenes, and always looked to begin conversations with those kids before their year with me — what were there interests? what was it that captured their imaginations? how could I use that to bring them into the learning community, instead of skirting the edges? How do I build in movement and humor? These are the questions I would ask and consider, so “that kid” would find a place in our class. But again, teachers are watched and paced and managed to teach to those test scores; and time is taken that would otherwise be the conversations and activities to honor the spirit of each kid.

Thanks for the reflection; it inspires me to continue the quest to honor each spirit.”

We have many students in our schools who follow different paths, and the current testing frenzy does not honor their spirit, talents, nor intellect. And in my research today I found this post by @EDUCareNow Learning as Belonging. Teaching and learning are social activities as we learn within a learning community for which all students are honored for who they are. It’s a great read and links to a document entitled, The School as a Community of Engaged Learners. Now that’s a goal to achieve. So thanks, Rob — you sent me searching for more support for a different type of education reform.

Play…

So as we post our own thoughts, we also read others, and in both those paused reflections and the continued followed or researched links, we discover a deeper understanding of ourselves and each other. And I am thankful for each connection.

Now, if only we could see this as learning, and build these connections and personalized journeys into our schools so each student becomes what is within.

8 thoughts on “#zerotohero Comment to Post: A Reflective Conversation

  1. Pingback: It Precedes Me | 20/20 Hines Sight

  2. Pingback: Let my Brain catch up | Incidents of a Dysfunctional Spraffer

  3. That is an awesome way for a teacher to conduct their continuing studies: searching for ways to honor the spirit in each student. I love the way you put that, too. I don’t know if I’ve said it before, but I wish more teachers were like you! I’ve met some that were tired, some determined, some disillusioned, and some downright skeptical; all with some level of belief that they’re there to help their students. A minority of them come off as rightly respectful of their charges’ individuality.

    Thanks for the mention, and thanks for reminding me that we’re still fighting the good fight. 🙂

    • Rob, Thanks for your kind words. Teachers’ work today is crammed with mandates from local, state, and federal agencies, requiring more paperwork and less time to focus on the faces of the students in front of them. It’s too bad those top-down forces don’t appreciate the need for the real and human interactions with those in their charge — it takes time and caring, which the new mandates’ pressures smother. But so many of us strive to do what our students need — caring time with accepting adults. Thanks again for stopping by, and for encouraging the “good fight.” Surf’s up! Time to hop on board and keep the balance!

  4. Pingback: Daily Prompt: Blogger of Repute | Nola Roots, Texas Heart

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s