Twelve Embarrassing Years of NCLB and RTTT: Time for Arne to Blame USDOE

 

 


Pause…

 


I teach full time, so I don’t have the time to research the issues, and this post sums up what we all might be thinking about: it is the DOE who’s been in charge of education — and look where it’s taken us. Schools are in neighborhoods, and it is those neighborhoods who should be deciding what is important for resources, curriculum and instruction, and community involvement in their schools for their students. I was especially concerned knowing that Arne Duncan has not taught in a classroom. How can you possibly understand the nuances of teaching and learning without having a classroom of jittery kindergarteners, of troubled teens, or of multi-national students before you to instruct for a period of time? And he has the audacity to blame everyone else. Of course, he’s apparently driven by those in the business world who want what? Employees for the jobs they are not creating? Or profits in the education businesses they will front? I know that is cynical and simplistic, but when education is attacked, including parents and students, then it’s time to step back and look at who’s talking.

 


Play…
This post by Mercedes Scheider reminds and demands of us that

Unlike many of the “pop-up teachers” nursed on the destructive doctrines of education privatization, traditional teachers are not in education in order to pad a resume on the way “up.” Traditional teachers are an indispensable part of the fabric of our democracy, and it is about time for Arne Duncan to recognize and respect that fact.

 

 

The ideas and links in this post are a good place to continue a conversation on our current focus in classrooms: improving test scores. Ask yourself, are you a score, a number? or are you a complex being with questions, talents, and intellect ready for thinking to understand the world? Will teaching to a test help you? Think about it: and support your schools and their fight against this madness.

 


PS: If you scored 396 and not 400, you did not meet the standards. You are at risk. You need extra help, not art, music, debate, drama, or advanced classes.

 


396: it means…. do you know? Does it really have meaning?

 

You may also like this by EDUCareNow: Learning as Belonging — Learning is a social activity, not a set of standards.

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